Meniere's Disease

What is Ménière's disease?

Ménière's disease is a balance disorder caused by an abnormality found in a section of the inner ear called the labyrinth.
There are an estimated 615,000 people in the US who have Ménière's disease, with 45,500 new cases diagnosed each year.

What causes Ménière's disease?

The labyrinth has two parts:

•    bony labyrinth
•    membranous labyrinth

The membranous labyrinth is encased in bone and contains a fluid called endolymph.
When the head moves, the endolymph also moves, which causes nerve receptors in the membranous labyrinth to signal the brain about the body's motion.
When, for some reason, the endolymph increases, the membranous labyrinth balloons or dilates (a condition called endolymphatic hydrops).
If the membranous labyrinth ruptures, the endolymph mixes with another inner ear fluid called perilymph.
The mixing of the two fluids is believed to cause the symptoms of Ménière's disease.

Treatment for Ménière's disease:

Specific treatment for Ménière's disease will be determined by your physician based on:

•    your age, overall health, and medical history
•    extent of the disease
•    your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies
•    expectations for the course of the disease
•    your opinion or preference

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